How much does it cost to fill up a paddling pool? | The Sun

HOT temperatures will have families reaching out for a paddling pool to cool down in this summer. 

The mercury reached a whopping 38C yesterday – and more hot weather is to come. 

But households are also facing rising bills as well as rising temperatures. 

So if you are thinking of bringing the paddling pool out of the shed you should think about how much it will cost to fill up. 

Here’s all you need to know. 

How much does it cost to full up a paddling pool? 

How much it costs to fill up your paddling pool depends on its size and how you pay your water bill.

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If you are on an unmetered contract it won’t cost you anything extra to fill. 

This is because your bill is not based on how much water you use – it is based on a standard charge which is already agreed with your provider. 

But if you are on a water meter, things could get expensive. 

Swimming pools come in a range of sizes, but the smallest standard size is usually 6ft wide – enough room to fit three to four kids in.

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These sized pools can hold up to 3,000 litres of water. 

"A large paddling pool that holds about 3,000 liters would cost you just over £10 to fill up."

If you filled up a pool every week for a month, it would cost you a whopping £43, according to Sarah Broomfield, energy savings expert at Uswitch.com.

An 8ft paddling pool or a 10ft pool – room enough for the whole family to fit in – will cost you even more.

Sarah said that if you are on a meter you are likely to be paying about one pence for every three liters of water you use.

So always check how many liters your pool is when full and then work out how much it will cost to fill.

"With so many of us relying on water during the hot weather, it’s good to be mindful about how much water you’re using and don’t let it go to waste," said Sarah.

"Thames Water suggests you reuse leftover paddling pool water by watering the plants or even washing your car.”

How can I cut the cost of my paddling pool?

If you are on a water meter, using a paddling pool could cost you a small fortune. 

But you can lower costs by buying sterilising fluid or using a filter – which means you don’t have to keep filling your pool up. 

Sterilising fluid can be picked up for as little as £1 from Sainsbury's – and will help stop the growth of bacteria and algae. 

Or you could get a filter that you place into your pool – when we checked prices online at Amazon, we found the cheapest ones would cost around £20.

You should always have a shop around to find the best price.

Some recommend using a chlorine float with a tablet, which just sits in the pool and gets to work.

However, you should be careful as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say that's it's "not safe to use bleach or pool disinfectant (chlorine or bromine) in the water in small inflatable or plastic kiddie pools and water slides."

What is a water meter and could I save on by bill?

If you are on a water meter you don't pay a fixed amount. That means if you reduce your water consumption you can lower your bill. 

The Consumer Council for Water (CCW) has a tool that can help you calculate how much money you could save if you decide to switch. 

But having a water meter can mean you pay more if your usage increases.

Martin Lewis recommends a simple check to make to see if you could save or not with a water meter.

If you've got more or the same number of bedrooms as people in your home, switching to a meter could save you money.

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That's because households without a meter are charged in line with the value of their property.

But if, for example, just two of you live in a four bedroom house, you're probably being charged more than you actually use.

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