Families torn apart by Boris Johnson's Christmas bubbles

Families torn apart by Boris Johnson’s Christmas bubbles: Women reveal how they’ll be forced to choose between divorced parents and their CHILDREN to comply with rules that only allow three separate households to mix

  • Three households can form a Christmas bubble from December 23 to 27 
  • Families have been placed in difficult position of choosing between loved ones
  • Others say they won’t risk mingling, despite the rules, in fear of spreading Covid 

Families from across the UK have revealed how the three-household ‘Christmas bubble’ rule means they will be forced to choose between family members this festive season. 

Boris Johnson confirmed yesterday that three households will be able to come together from December 23 to 27. The UK Government and devolved administrations also agreed to relax social distancing rules, allowing loved ones to hug for the first time in months.

However the restrictions mean families will be forced to make difficult decisions on who to see over Christmas. 

Kayleigh White, a 32-year-old support worker from Staffordshire, told FEMAIL she will have to choose between her divorced parents, while Ann-Marie Rigg, 47, a laundry worker, from Long Eaton, Nottinghamshire, will not be able to see all five of her children. 

Boris Johnson warned families they must make a ‘personal judgement’ about the risks of coronavirus to vulnerable loved ones when forming a Christmas bubble and some social media users insisted they will not take the risk.

I’M STUCK IN THE MIDDLE OF DIVORCED PARENTS 

Kayleigh White, a support worker from Staffordshire, says she struggles with the idea that she can work with strangers but won’t be able to spend Christmas with cherished family members

Pictured, back row from left: Lauren and Terri, Kayleigh’s sisters. Middle row from left: Kayleight’s mum Tracy, nan Rita and cousin Caitlyn. Front row, from left, Kayleigh, and Donna, Kayleigh’s auntie. The family members pictured are from five different households and don’t include Kayleigh’s dad and husband’s family

Kayleigh White, a 32-year-old support worker from Staffordshire, says she struggles with the idea that she can work with strangers every day but won’t be able to spend Christmas with cherished family members 

I have a huge dilemma at the moment; I have worked throughout this pandemic as a support worker, meeting different people every day. My parents are divorced so live separately. 

While my dad lives in Derby with his wife, who has three older children with children of their own, my mum lives with my nan and her brother. My nan and mum are in the vulnerable category, and my uncle works at the local hospital. 

I have two sisters who also have children of their own, and this all on just my side of the family. My husband’s family have decided not see anyone over Christmas at all, and I’m stuck in the middle, it’s an awful situation to be in.

My husband suffers with his mental health and I’m very stressed trying to with work, look after my family at home, and not being able to spend time with my mum, it’s really difficult.

I feel so isolated, I suppose a lot of people do at this terrible time, but this situation is not helping. It’s hard that I can work with strangers but I can’t see my family when I know exactly where they have been and how careful they’ve been.

I’D HAVE TO BREAK THE RULES TO SEE ALL OF MY CHILDREN

Ann-Marie, , 47, a laundry worker, from Long Eaton, Nottinghamshire, with son Thomas, 12

Pictured: Ann-Marie Riggs’ five children, from left: Jamie, Jennifer, Thomas, Paige and Marcus

Separated mother-of-five Ann-Marie Rigg, 47, a laundry worker, from Long Eaton, Nottinghamshire, faces spending Christmas alone with her youngest son or breaking Boris’ rule because four of her children are grown-up.

My son Thomas is 12 and I have four grown-up children, Jamie, Jennifer, Paige and Marcus. Thomas and I live together but if I want to spend Christmas with my four older children, who all live separately, then he’ll have to go to his father’s house, which means potentially putting him in a bubble of up to six households, which is obviously against the rules and could put him in danger.

Being separated makes it much harder to organise and if I want to stick to the rules then I will have to spend Christmas on my own to safeguard my child.

‘NOT SEEING MY CHILDREN SO I CAN SPEND TIME WITH DAD’ 

Writer and mother-of-four Jacqui Deevoy, 58, from west London, will not be able to see any of her children for Christmas this year and will see her father, 77, instead

Writer and mother-of-four Jacqui Deevoy, 58, from west London, will not be able to see any of her children for Christmas this year due to the lockdown rules and will instead spend the day with her 77-year-old father.  

‘It’s always difficult at Christmas for me but this Christmas is even harder. Ideally, I’d love the whole family – myself, my dad, my four adult children and my three-year-old grandson, his dad and the other granny – to spend it together, but that’s just not possible, moreso now than ever.

‘My eldest daughter, aged 31, lives in Scotland with her partner and their son – my grandson – and her partner’s mum. My other three children, aged 25, 23 and 21, live in separate households in different parts of London. My 77-year-old dad lives in Essex.

‘Ideally, I’d love to spend Christmas with them all, but that’s not happening this year. I’ve decided to keep my dad company over Christmas instead of enjoying a big family celebration. 

‘He was in a care home after having a stroke but I took him out after being told by the home, at the start of the second lockdown, that no visitors were allowed – again. He’s so happy to be home so we’ll be celebrating that as well as Christmas.’

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